We’re Talking Turkey...Logos

By Matthias Roberge // Published on Nov 18, 2010

It's that time again, the trees have shed their leaves, Christmas music has started playing in the stores, and we prepare for the one day of year when it’s encouraged to gorge ourselves silly.

In honor of that delectable bird we baste to perfection every thanksgiving (at least for us carnivores) I'm taking a closer look at a few companies & organizations that have used the gobbler to identify themselves:

 

NWTF

The National Wild Turkey Federation seems to be transitioning their old "patch" logo on the top in favor of the gentler, more  innocuous silhouette / acronym mark below.  In the vain of the World Wildlife Fund panda, the new logo helps to position the organization as conservation focused and minimizes the hunting aspect of the group.

Virginia Tech’s alternate logo featuring the Hokie’s roided up mascot in front of the classic VT type treatment. Is it just me, or is there is something very unsettling about this bird’s ripped physique? Creepy.

Wild Turkey, yes we’re quite familiar with this one. Classic wildlife illustration, like something out of an Audubon journal. Nice type treatment as well, great touch with slightly dropping the “R” descender. Stay classy.

Carolina Turkey uses a nicely basted bird on a bed of greens. Typically, marks using an image of the actual product within the logo don’t work too well, but this does the trick. You want a turkey? Here is a turkey.

Okay so this is obviously the country Turkey, although the icon does seem to have some bird-like features. The ink stroke type is nice, very evocative of that region of the world. I always find it interesting when countries create an identifying logo, branding a country would make a nice addition to our book of work (hint hint Mr. Obama).


I’m sure there are some other interesting uses of turkeys out there, it is a cultural icon. I’m looking forward to focusing on the real thing in a few days.
 

 

"I have always believed that when a creative mind is given freedom to roam at will, the place where it characteristically spends its time is the human heart."
- Phil Dusenberry