Fumble?

By Chris Hislop // Published on Jul 26, 2013

In a world of constant change organizations are constantly in a state of continually creating fresh ideas for their brand. It keeps them popping up on people’s radars. New and fresh means new vested interest and the stacking of cash in the register (sometimes).

There are times when the philosophy “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” simply doesn’t apply. Marketing is about engaging, and if you’re not engaging, you may not be broken, but you’re getting closer and closer to becoming tomorrow’s crouton.

Change. It’ll always exist. This includes professional sports teams.

How do you feel about your favorite franchise switching out their brand identity from time to time? What good does it serve, if at all? Is it merely a ploy to get fans to re-up and invest more hard-earned coin into their jersey and t-shirt collection? Sure, nobody wants to be the dude in the stadium wearing the dated Drew Bledsoe jersey. (Okay, okay, there’s always one…) Nobody wants to wear last years Brady jersey (if the logo is new this year). If you want to be hip, you gotta be hip to the trend… you gotta be one with the change(s), right?

If you answered, “yes,” keep your wallet open.



The New England Patriots have recently unleashed another logo design, which is sure to pop up on t-shirts in shops everywhere. It is said that this new design may only be used for the graphic in the endzone (which is the place on the gridiron where touchdowns are scored, if you found yourself confused there for a second), but you know the powers that be are going to look to cash in on this design. Why wouldn’t they?

So the question is: Are you buying in? How do you feel about the new concept? Is it on par with identities of the past? Does it say football as much as the original does? Do any of the recent designs top the original logo? Like anything that exists in a world of change – it’s debatable. Quite literally, it's BOLD. We’d love to hear what you think!

Tagged Under: Obscure Fun
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